365 days in my shoes Day 297

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What another week of fabulous blog posts hitting the timelines!

Great variety this week. An ORRsome selection to read.

One minute wonder with Dan Roberts via @chickenplymouth
http://www.imagineeducation.net/whatshappening/?p=469

The Trojan mouse via @kevbartle
http://dailygenius.wordpress.com/2013/10/20/the-gruffalo-an-allegory-for-trojan-mice/

Graphic scores from @classicfm
http://www.classicfm.com/discover/music/graphic-scores-art-music-pictures/cage-water-music/

Via Alex Quigley @huntingenglish One to one feedback and testing what works.
http://www.huntingenglish.com/2013/10/17/one-one-feedback-testing-works/

Questioning the questions with Chris Curtis via @Xris32
http://learningfrommymistakesenglish.blogspot.co.uk/2013/10/questioning-questions.html?m=0

Monkey learns via @hgaldinoshea
http://monkeylearns.blogspot.co.uk/2013/10/tlt13-my-presentation-on-questioning.html

The 10 stages of twitter via Daniel Edwards
http://dedwards.me/2012/06/13/teachers-the-10-stages-of-twitter/

The guilty teacher by Ross McGill @teachertoolkit
http://teachertoolkit.me/2013/10/18/the-guiltyteacher-guilty-as-charged-by-teachertoolkit/?utm_source=buffer&utm_campaign=Buffer&utm_content=buffera4d2b&utm_medium=twitter

Next generation learning Steve Wheeler via @timbuckteeth
http://steve-wheeler.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/next-generation-learning.html

Bad SMT via @oldandrewuk
http://teachingbattleground.wordpress.com/2013/10/19/how-to-be-bad-smt/

Mr Gove’s brilliant idea via @PaulbernalUK
http://paulbernal.wordpress.com/2013/10/20/mr-goves-brilliant-idea/

What makes a good leader? Via @TessaLMatthews
http://tabularasaeducation.wordpress.com/2013/10/19/school-leaders/

Always an amazing MUST read from John Tomsett
http://johntomsett.wordpress.com/2013/10/20/this-much-i-know-about-developing-a-dweck-inspired-growth-mindset-culture/

365 days in my shoes Day 296

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Shakespeare fans – a bit of fun!

To be or not to be?

Macbeth
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Titus Andronicus
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Henry IV part two
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King Lear
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Words for whom we have William Shakespeare to thank.

1. ADDICTION: OTHELLO, ACT II, SCENE II

“It is Othello’s pleasure, our noble and valiant general, that, upon certain tidings now arrived, importing the mere perdition of the Turkish fleet, every man put himself into triumph; some to dance, some to make bonfires, each man to what sport and revels his addiction leads him.” – Herald

If not for that noble and valiant general and his playwright, our celebrity news coverage might be sorely lacking.

2. ARCH-VILLAIN: TIMON OF ATHENS, ACT V, SCENE I

“You that way and you this, but two in company; each man apart, all single and alone, yet an arch-villain keeps him company.” – Timon

With the added prefix of arch-, meaning more extreme than others of the same type, Shakespeare was able to distinguish the baddest of the bad.

3. ASSASSINATION: MACBETH, ACT I, SCENE VII

“If it were done when ’tis done, then ’twere well it were done quickly: if the assassination could trammel up the consequence, and catch with his surcease success.” – Macbeth

Though the term “assassin” had been observed in use prior to the Scottish play, it seems apt that the work introduced yet another term for murder most foul.

4. BEDAZZLED: THE TAMING OF THE SHREW, ACT IV, SCENE V

“Pardon, old father, my mistaking eyes, that have been so bedazzled with the sun that everything I look on seemeth green.” – Katherina

A word first used to describe the particular gleam of sunlight is now used to sell rhinestone-embellished jeans. Maybe poetry really is dead.

5. BELONGINGS: MEASURE FOR MEASURE, ACT I, SCENE I

“Thyself and thy belongings are not thine own so proper as to waste thyself upon thy virtues, they on thee.” – Duke Vincentio

People prior to Shakespeare’s time did own things; they just referred to them by different words.

6. COLD-BLOODED: KING JOHN, ACT III, SCENE I

“Thou cold-blooded slave, hast thou not spoke like thunder on my side, been sworn my soldier, bidding me depend upon thy stars, thy fortune and thy strength, and dost thou now fall over to my fores?” – Constance

Beyond its literal meaning, the 17th-century play initiated a metaphorical use for the term that is now most often used to describe serial killers and vampires—two categories which, of course, need not be mutually exclusive.

7. DISHEARTEN: HENRY V, ACT IV, SCENE I

“Therefore when he sees reason of fears, as we do, his fears, out of doubt, be of the same relish as ours are: yet, in reason, no man should possess him with any appearance of fear, lest he, by showing it, should dishearten his army.” – King Henry V

The opposite of “hearten,” a word already extant at the time of Shakespeare’s writing, “dishearten” was most appropriately first utilized in print by King Henry V, who didn’t let insurmountable odds at the Battle of Agincourt get him down.

8. EVENTFUL: AS YOU LIKE IT, ACT II, SCENE VII

“Last scene of all, that ends this strange eventful history, is second childishness and mere oblivion, sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.” – Jaques

If all the world’s a stage, it’s safe to assume that an event or two is taking place.

9. EYEBALL: THE TEMPEST, ACT I, SCENE II

“Go make thyself like a nymph o’ the sea: be subject to no sight but thine and mine, invisible to every eyeball else.” – Prospero

Shakespeare’s protagonist Prospero, though no medical doctor, can claim to be the first fictional character to name those round objects with which we see.

10. FASHIONABLE: TROILUS AND CRESSIDA, ACT III, SCENE III

“For time is like a fashionable host that slightly shakes his parting guest by the hand, and with his arms outstretch’d, as he would fly, grasps in the comer: welcome ever smiles, and farewell goes out sighing.” – Ulysses

And with just 11 letters, centuries of debate over what’s hot or not began.

11. HALF-BLOODED/HOT-BLOODED: KING LEAR, ACT V, SCENE III/ ACT III, SCENE III

“Half-blooded fellow, yes.” – Albany

“Why, the hot-blooded France, that dowerless took our youngest born, I could as well be brought to knee his throne, and, squire-like; pension beg to keep base life afoot.” – Lear

As is the tradition in Shakespearean tragedy, nearly everyone in King Lear dies, so the linguistic fascination here with blood is unsurprising, to say the least.

12. INAUDIBLE: ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL, ACT V, SCENE III

“Let’s take the instant by the forward top; for we are old, and on our quick’st decrees the inaudible and noiseless foot of Time steals ere we can effect them.” – King of France

One of a number of words (invulnerable, indistinguishable, inauspicious, among others) which Shakespeare invented only in the sense of adding a negative in- prefix where it had never been before.

13. LADYBIRD: ROMEO AND JULIET, ACT I, SCENE III

“What, lamb! What, ladybird! God forbid! Where’s this girl? What, Juliet!” – Nurse

Although the Oxford English Dictionary notes that this particular term of endearment has fallen into disuse, maybe it’s about time for its comeback. Valentine’s Day is coming up, after all.

14. MANAGER: A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM, ACT V, SCENE I

“Where is our usual manager of mirth? What revels are in hand? Is there no play to ease the anguish of a torturing hour?” – King Theseus

If not for Shakespeare, workday complaining in the office break room just wouldn’t be the same.

15. MULTITUDINOUS: MACBETH, ACT II, SCENE II

“No, this my hand will rather the multitudinous seas in incarnadine, making the green one red.” – Macbeth

“Multitudinous” may not be the most appropriate synonym when the phrase “a lot” starts to crop up too often in your writing, but it’s certainly the one with the most letters.

16. NEW-FANGLED: LOVE’S LABOUR’S LOST, ACT I, SCENE I

“At Christmas I no more desire a rose than wish a snow in May’s new-fangled mirth.” – Biron

Ironically, this word sounds old-fashioned if used today.

17. PAGEANTRY: PERICLES, PRINCE OF TYRE, ACT V, SCENE II

“This, my last boon, give me, for such kindness must relieve me, that you aptly will suppose what pageantry, what feats, what shows, what minstrelsy, and pretty din, the regent made in Mytilene to greet the king.” – Gower

Although modern scholars generally agree that Shakespeare only appears to have written the second half of the play, this newly invented term for an extravagant ceremonial display appears in the section definitively authored by the Bard.

18. SCUFFLE: ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA, ACT I, SCENE I

“His captain’s heart, which in the scuffles of great fights hath burst the buckles on his breast, reneges all temper, and is become the bellows and the fan to cool a gipsy’s lust.” – Philo

Another example of an existing verb that Shakespeare decided could stand up just as well as a noun.

19. SWAGGER: HENRY V, ACT II, SCENE IV/A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM, ACT III, SCENE I

“An’t please your majesty, a rascal that swaggered with me last night.” – Williams

“What hempen home-spuns have we swaggering here, so near the cradle of the fairy queen?” – Puck

By transitive property, Shakespeare is responsible for Justin Bieber’s “swag.”

20. UNCOMFORTABLE: ROMEO AND JULIET, ACT IV, SCENE V

“Despised, distressed, hated, martyr’d, kill’d! Uncomfortable time, why camest thou now to murder, murder our solemnity?” – Capulet

Un- was another prefix Shakespeare appended to adjectives with a liberal hand. In the case of Romeo and Juliet, a tragedy in which a father mourns his daughter’s suicide, “uncomfortable” seems to have originated with a slightly more drastic sense than how we use it now.

Of course, just because the first written instances of these terms appeared in Shakespeare’s scripts doesn’t preclude the possibility that they existed in the oral tradition prior to his recording them, but as Shakespeare might have said, it was high time (The Comedy of Errors) for such household words (Henry V).

Fab fun here!

365 days in my shoes Day 295

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How are you?

Are you well? Good!

If not, never feel guilty.

Having read @Teachertoolkit blog post on feeling guilty and not looking after oneself, this is for everyone who needs to make sure they have some ‘me time’.

http://teachertoolkit.me/2013/10/18/the-guiltyteacher-guilty-as-charged-by-teachertoolkit/

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I have an amazing staff at my new school. We have had an incredibly busy and intense start to our first half term together. Obviously, I am keen to get off to a great start and we want the best for our school. I know my staff work tirelessly, relentlessly and go the extra mile. They put children at the heart of everything we do.

It is my job to look after them. To make sure they have time allocated for whole school areas and issues etc…

It’s very easy to tell someone they need to out themselves or family first, isn’t it? The hard bit is actually DOING IT!

I have been overwhelmed by how much they look out for and after me.

Emails and texts this week have shown me how much the staff I am privileged to lead are very much a ‘we’ and an ‘us’. There definitely isn’t an ‘I’ in team where I am working.

In order to look after others one has to be able to look after oneself.

I know I have burned the candle at both ends and the middle over the last few weeks. Have I cleared the decks yet? Probably not and probably never will. Our decks never really clear, do they? I am sure a lot of things piling up on our decks are our choice and ultimately our fault.

However, no matter how well you want to do, how much you want to impress, or how hard you think you are working; you must always stop, reflect, evaluate and ensure you have that moment of downtime, the me time, being you and knowing it is good enough.

I also feel very privileged to have some amazing head teacher and other SLMT contacts on twitter who check up on me every now and again, and likewise, I check up on them too.

Whether it’s a text, DM, email or phone call, just knowing you’re being thought of, being asked how things are, how you are etc… a little reminder about leaving work at a reasonable hour, leaving the work in the workplace and not bringing it home all the time etc… Often it can be easy to tell others to do all of this but not so easy to do it yourself and that’s when you really need the nudge in the right direction from others every now and again.

We look out for each other.

We aim high to be the best we can be.

We look out for each other at all times.

Working together achieves mORR.

Make sure you stop and simply be!

STOP, THINK, RESPECT YOURSELF!

STOP
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THINK
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RESPECT YOURSELF
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TAKE GOOD CARE OF YOURSELF!

“Do something every day that is loving toward your body and gives you the opportunity to enjoy the sensations of your body.” ~Golda Poretsky

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“There are days I drop words of comfort on myself like falling leaves and remember that it is enough to be taken care of by my self.” ~Brian Andreas

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“Your breathing is your greatest friend. Return to it in all your troubles and you will find comfort and guidance.” ~Unknown

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“When the well’s dry, we know the worth of water.” ~ Benjamin Franklin

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”In dealing with those who are undergoing great suffering, if you feel “burnout” setting in, if you feel demoralized and exhausted, it is best, for the sake of everyone, to withdraw and restore yourself. The point is to have a long-term perspective.” ~ Dalai Lama

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“Allow yourself to enjoy each happy moment in your life.” ~ Steve Maraboli

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“The only person who can pull me down is myself, and I’m not going to let myself pull me down anymore.” ~C. Joybell C.

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“Our bodies are our gardens to which our wills are gardeners” ~ William Shakespeare

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“Don’t sacrifice yourself too much, because if you sacrifice too much there’s nothing else you can give and nobody will care for you.” ~ Karl Lagerfeld

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“Nourishing yourself in a way that helps you blossom in the direction you want to go is attainable, and you are worth the effort.” ~Deborah Day

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Take care of yourself before taking care of others who more than likely don’t even appreciate what you do for them!

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While loving and taking care of others don’t forget to love and take care of your

Know what you do is enough and it is GOOD enough.

You are enough!

Be you!

We will survive!

365 days in my shoes Day 294

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It’s Monday. Make it count.

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One mORR week until half term.

Time for HAPPINESS!

Smile every chance you get. Not because life has been easy, perfect, or exactly as you had anticipated, but because you choose to be happy and grateful for all the good things you do have and all the problems you know you don’t have.

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Never let a bad day make you feel like you have a bad life.
Tell the negativity committee that meets inside your head to sit down and shut up.

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A bad attitude is like a flat tire, you can’t get very far until you change it.

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In a world where you can be anything you want, BE YOURSELF.
The more you love your decisions, the less you need others to love them.

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It’s important to make someone happy, and it’s important to start with yourself.

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Life is not about making others happy. Life is about sharing your happiness with others.

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Happiness is not something you postpone for the future; it is something you design into the present.

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If you settle for just anything, you’ll never know what you’re truly worthy of.

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Sometimes life gives you two options: losing yourself or losing someone else. Regardless of the situation, don’t lose yourself.
If your happiness depends on what somebody else does, you do have a pretty big problem.

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Don’t worry. Be happy.

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“Don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened.”
― Dr. Seuss

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“For every minute you are angry you lose sixty seconds of happiness.”
― Ralph Waldo Emerson

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“Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.”
― Dalai Lama XIV

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“Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know.”
― Ernest Hemingway

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“The most important thing is to enjoy your life—to be happy—it’s all that matters.”
― Audrey Hepburn

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“Let us be grateful to the people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.”
― Marcel Proust

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“Sanity and happiness are an impossible combination.”
― Mark Twain

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“Success is getting what you want, happiness is wanting what you get”
― W.P. Kinsella

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“Happiness quite unshared can scarcely be called happiness; it has no taste.”
― Charlotte Brontë

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365 days in my shoes Day 293

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Great ideas for resources this week!

@Primary_Ed: A GREAT questioning matrix to develop children’s understanding. http://t.co/i08qoWx3uE #ukedchat #edchat #edtech #sunchat #questioning
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@ICTmagic: http://t.co/4cFDypVroo A useful countdown timer which you can set from 10 second up to 6 hours. #ukedchat #edchat #edtech

Using illusions as starter activities via @magicalmaths
http://www.magicalmaths.org/top-3-how-many-faces-do-you-see-amazing-starter-illusions/
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Anti bullying resources
http://www.kidshelp.com.au/grownups/news-research/teacher-resources/bullying-lesson-resources.php

@arti_choke: Five powerful questions for reflection and next steps. #SOLOTaxonomy HookED Five http://t.co/lgUJBrR5Po http://t.co/ubyr6iJ6sG
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365 days in my shoes Day 292

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@UberFacts: This is a picture of a nuclear explosion less than one millisecond after detonation. http://t.co/wP2uMaWcCh
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@RachelOrr: “@Gwenelope: Just fab…. http://t.co/qHDV4aEhU9”

ORRsome it is. Love it I do.
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@Badheadteacher: Our ‘Mocksted’ now renamed ‘Micksted’, I’ll be dressing up as Sir Michael Wilshaw and shouting about not having a preferred dress sense..

@Primary_Ed: The essentials of numeracy. GREAT for Maths Teachers. http://t.co/7lSVuamK8N #ukedchat #edchat #edtech #sunchat #mathchat #mathscpdchat
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@jasonelsom: Be courageous tomorrow!! http://t.co/5Ftcj5y6pK
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Michael Rosen on phonics teaching :-
@MichaelRosenYes: There’s no evidence to suggest systematic phonics enables older children to understand what they read any better than from mixed methods.

@MichaelRosenYes: Phonics is taught because it’s tested not because it works.

@pkainsworth: “@murphiegirl: @RealGeoffBarton ‘s 100 A* words on my window so they’re always in view. http://t.co/61xdhdlUHH” simple but great!
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@RealGeoffBarton: ‘Croydon academy bans slang’: good topic for debate about attitudes to language: @bbc http://t.co/OZW72BWf1K #LangChange
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Time flows backwards!
@headguruteacher: Time flows backwards at the Glyn School. At least in @jonchaloner’s office. http://t.co/2BHCy3GUSt
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Fabulous number plate via @timrylands
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@TimRylands: After my previous van spotting, this also tickled me: http://t.co/wpU7YAfs73
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Via Steve Wheeler @timbuckteeth
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365 days in my shoes Day 291

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Oh what a week! Really busy one this week. Where has the time gone?

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This weekend said goodbye to the flowers in my garden. Although it rained, within two hours every last leaf and petal from geranium, begonia, petunia and lobelia was squished into garden bags ready for the garden waste. After the time it took to plant, even more time to grow and become a nap established summer garden, within hours it was as though nothing had ever been there.

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I love Mondays. I’m not one to be wishing every day to be Friday and one to have the dreaded Monday feeling. I know I’m at my best on a Monday and sometimes by Friday can feel the fast pace of the week.

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Tuesday – great session with our LA looking at implementing the new curriculum for primary as well as being introduced to our LA’s version of assessment in the new curriculum. I love the fact that it is probably the first assessment I have seen that takes the lead from EYFS and can probably be seamless from end of reception into Year one.

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Didn’t it rain! The heavens opened several times user the course of today and for the first time I noticed at the end of the day how cold it had become.

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I arrived home today to two parcels – or should I say the two card to tell me the postman tried to deliver parcels that were too large to fit the letter box. Hopefully tomorrow morning’s job will be to visit the back door of the post office before 7am and collect said parcels. I’m hoping they are my Christmas cards and my delivery from Firefox.com. I was the proud winner at Woodham Teachmeet a few weeks ago of £50 worth of Vivo vouchers to be spent on Firefox.com. It has taken me ages to choose something. I have ended up with some kitchen type gadgets. A corkcicle, a rice cube and a lunch pot type thingy.

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It’s now Friday and the weekend is about to begin. As I reflect on the week that has been and refer back to the hours it took for my garden to blossom and then so quickly to be no more; I know that I have spent far too many hours this week and too many late nights focused on one thing. The job. This has been my choice but equally my fault. I’d like to think the hours have made a difference. But no matter how hard, how smart or how long you work, there will always be mORR.

This weekend is family time. Time with my Mum and Dad. Time together. Time for us.