365 days in my shoes Day 101

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Five a week maths

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One of our five a week areas to focus upon as a whole school is place value and how that also fits in with partitioning numbers.

The aim of five a week maths is to keep basic skills sharp at all times. It’s not about having a mental and oral starter within a maths lesson. This is 10-15 minutes before the lesson with an explicit focus on place value and partitioning at the ability level of the children. It mustn’t be a death by worksheet exercise and is all about direct teaching and not leaving the children something to get on with.

It needs to be fast paced with high impact but low maintenance on the teacher’s part. Teachers have enough to plan for than spending ages making resources. Staff make use of maths APPS and on-line interactive games as well as pure hands on practical work.

If taught correctly and thoroughly children will have a secure understanding of numbers and the number system. Children will not confuse ‘teen’ numbers with ‘ty’ numbers because all they have taught is by rote. They will understand the patterns and values of digits and numbers. Children will not end up writing one hundred and three and 1003.

Our staff mapped out progression for place value and partitioning as outlined below.

Staff worked in teams with representation from EYFS through to Y6. It’s important that all staff know where to start and where they are going to when teaching progression. It’s not about simply working your way through the list/levels. It’s about making sure children are totally secure. There isn’t any point racing through the levels if something is not secure as it will only impact negatively further down the line because a link in the chain has been missed.

My favourite phrase for place value has always been…

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WORKING TOWARDS

Begin to organise and categorise objects.
Select a small number of objects from a group.
Separate a group of 3 or 4 objects in different ways.
Begin to recognise that the total is still the same.
Recite number names in sequence.
Recites number names in order to 10 and back.
Recite number names in order to 20 and back.
Say a number that is one more and one less than a given number (within 10)
Place numbers 1-20 in order.
Say which number is one more or less than a given number to 20.

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Level 1

Count up to 50 forwards and backwards.
Recognise place value in numbers up to 50.
Recognise place value up to 100.
Count on and back in 10s and beyond 100.​
Read, write and compare numbers up to 100.
Understand that numbers are made up of tens and ones/units.
Partition a 2 digit number using apparatus (up to 20)
Partition a two digit number using apparatus (up to 50)
Know what each digit represents in numbers from 10-20.

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Level 2

Partition numbers into tens and units.
Say what each digit represents in any 2 digit number.
Begin to partition 3 digit numbers.
Recognise place value in numbers up to 100 mentally.
Partition numbers up to 100 including 0 as the place holder.
Begin to partition 3 digit numbers.
Read and write numbers (in words) up to 100.

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Level 3

Practise counting in units, tens and hundreds.
Know the value of each digit in numbers up to 1000.
Partition numbers up to 1000.
Compare and order 3 digit numbers.
Read and write 3 digit numbers.
Read and write numbers beyond 1000.
Know what each digit represents in numbers up to and beyond 1000.
Partition 4 digit numbers.

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Level 4

Partition 1 place decimal numbers.
Partition 5/6 digit numbers.
Partition 5/6 digit numbers using 0 as a place holder.
Partition 7 digit numbers as millions.
Partition 2 place decimals.
Apply place value knowledge to multiply and divide by 10, 100 and 1000.

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Level 5

Partition 3 place decimal numbers.
Use place value knowledge to multiply decimals to any power of 10. (1.520).

Ideas for place value games:-

http://resources.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/maths/interactive/numbers.htm#Place

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1 thought on “365 days in my shoes Day 101

  1. Pingback: Tweak of the Week 17th April- Welcome back! | From the Sandpit....

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