365 days in my shoes Day 120

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Five a week English all in one place.

Word of mouth

As my blog tends to run in chronological order, I thought it useful, perhaps, to collate all the links to five a week English in one place.

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FIVE A WEEK ENGLISH OVERVIEW

https://highheelsandhighnotes.wordpress.com/2013/03/19/365-days-in-my-shoes-day-78/

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PROGRESSION IN PUNCTUATION

https://highheelsandhighnotes.wordpress.com/2013/04/14/365-days-in-my-shoes-day-104/

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PROGRESSION IN GRAMMAR/TERMINOLOGY

https://highheelsandhighnotes.wordpress.com/2013/04/02/365-days-in-my-shoes-day-92/

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PROGRESSION IN TEXT STRUCTURE

https://highheelsandhighnotes.wordpress.com/2013/04/27/365-days-in-my-shoes-day-117/

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PROGRESSION IN SENTENCE STRUCTURE

https://highheelsandhighnotes.wordpress.com/2013/04/17/365-days-in-my-shoes-day-107/

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PROGRESSION IN WORD STRUCTURE AND LANGUAGE

https://highheelsandhighnotes.wordpress.com/2013/04/21/365-days-in-my-shoes-day-111/

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This last picture has absolutely nothing to do with this log, simply loved it.

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Speak my language

365 days in my shoes Day 119

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It’s Monday!

Time to be YOU!

“Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
― Oscar Wilde

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To be nobody but yourself in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting. ~e.e. cummings, 1955

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God has given you one face, and you make yourself another. ~William Shakespeare

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The life of every man is a diary in which he means to write one story, and writes another. ~James Matthew Barrie

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Always be a first-rate version of yourself, instead of a second-rate version of somebody else. ~Judy Garland

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Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else’s opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation. ~Oscar Wilde, De Profundis, 1905

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I am told to just be myself, but as much as I have practiced the impression, I am still no good at it. ~Robert Brault

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It takes courage to grow up and become who you really are. ~e.e. cummings

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How many cares one loses when one decides not to be something but to be someone. ~Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel

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Never be bullied into silence. Never allow yourself to be made a victim. Accept no one’s definition of your life; define yourself. ~Harvey Fierstein

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Learn to… be what you are, and learn to resign with a good grace all that you are not. ~Henri Frederic Amiel

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No man can climb out beyond the limitations of his own character. ~John Morley

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If God had wanted me otherwise, He would have created me otherwise. ~Johann von Goethe

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Let the world know you as you are, not as you think you should be, because sooner or later, if you are posing, you will forget the pose, and then where are you? ~Fanny Brice

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Wheresoever you go, go with all your heart. ~Kongzi

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Originality is… a by-product of sincerity. ~Marianne Moore

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Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. ~Steve Jobs

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To be natural is such a very difficult pose to keep up. ~Oscar Wilde

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Best be yourself, imperial, plain and true! ~Robert Browning, “Bishop Blougram’s Apology,” Men and Women

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Don’t forget that your spirit-twinkle makes life’s rainbow shine bright. ~Terri Guillemets

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All the knowledge I possess everyone else can acquire, but my heart is all my own. ~Johann von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther, 1774

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365 days in my shoes Day 118

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Today’s offering is linked to top people to follow on twitter – a bit of a who’s who and interesting and quirky people to follow for all sorts of reasons.

The added quirk is Mozart!

There are 92 of my favourite twitterati in one aria.

Are you on the list?

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@kevbartle @chickensaltash @TeacherToolkit @danielharvey9 @Pekabelo @ThatIanGilbert @TheHeadsOffice @LearningSpy @DeputyMitchell @Totallywired77 @redgierob @headguruteacher @mrlockyer @kennypieper @HuntingEnglish @johntomsett @RealGeoffBarton @oliverquinlan @ICTEvangelist @JOHNSAYERS @simfin @stevebunce @PieCorbett @MultiMartin @aknill @MichaelRosenYes @SLTchat @Gwenelope @TeamTait @Joga5 @dughall @ianaddison @Edutronic_Net @theprimaryhead @beetlebug1 @timrylands @MooreLynne1 @betsysalt @andrew_cowley23 @HeadsRoundtable @lisajaneashes @dylanwiliam @oldandrewuk @Gripweed1 @vicgoddard @thelazyteacher @ChrisChivers2 @pedagoo @ICTmagic @TheRealMrRoo @rlj1981 @eyebeams @mike_gunn @ethinking @chrismayoh @developingTandL @hgaldinoshea @tombennett71 @dawnhallybone @DexNott @russellprue @syded06 @xannov @educationgovuk @Simon_Warburton @Magicfullstop @HYWEL_ROBERTS @Skinnyboyevans @philallman1 @ieshasmall @MrWaldram @HeyMissSmith @mobo40 @paulshanks1974 @seatonburnDCO @MsFindlater @e_gran @Jo_Mrs_H @bevevans22 @MrPhonics @pivotalpaul @tes @tesPrimary @tesMaths @tesEdTech @tesResources @tesEnglish @tesScience @teseditor @tesMFL @tes_SEN @RachelOrr

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FOLLOW ME FOLLOW YOU

365 days in my shoes Day 117

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Five a week English

Progression in text structure

Reception

Introduce:
Planning Tool –Story map /story mountain

Whole class retelling of story

Understanding of beginning/ middle / end

Retell simple 5-part story:
Once upon a time
First / Then / Next
But
So
Finally,…..happily ever after

Non-fiction:
Factual writing closely linked to a story

Simple factual sentences based around a theme
Names
Labels
Captions
Lists
Diagrams
Message

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Year 1

Introduce:

Fiction:

Planning Tools: Story map / story mountain
(Refer to Story-Type grids)

Plan opening around character(s), setting, time of day and type of weather

Understanding – beginning /middle /end to a story
Understanding – 5 parts to a story:

Opening
Once upon a time…

Build-up
One day…

Problem / Dilemma
Suddenly,../ Unfortunately,…

Resolution
Fortunately,…

Ending
Finally,….

Non-fiction:
(Refer to Connectives and Sentence Signposts document for Introduction and Endings)

Planning tools:
text map / washing line

Heading

Introduction
Opening factual statement

Middle section(s)
Simple factual sentences around a them

Bullet points for instructions

Labelled diagrams

Ending
Concluding sentence

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Year 2

Introduce:

Fiction
Secure use of planning tools: Story map / story mountain / story grids/ ’Boxing-up’ grid
(Refer to Story Types grids)

Plan opening around character(s), setting, time of day and type of weather

Understanding 5 parts to a story with more complex vocabulary

Opening e.g.
In a land far away….
One cold but bright morning…..
Build-up e.g.
Later that day
Problem / Dilemma e.g.
To his amazement
Resolution e.g.
As soon as
Ending e.g.
Luckily, Fortunately,

Ending should be a section rather than one final sentence e.g. suggest how the main character is feeling in the final situation.

Non-Fiction
(Refer to Connectives and Sentence Signposts document for Introduction and Endings)

Introduce:
Secure use of planning tools: Text map / washing line / ‘Boxing –up’ grid
Introduction: Heading
Hook to engage reader Factual statement / definition
Opening question

Middle section(s)
Group related ideas / facts into sections
Sub headings to introduce sentences /sections
Use of lists – what is needed / lists of steps to be taken Bullet points for facts Diagrams Ending Make final comment to reader Extra tips! / Did-you-know? facts / True or false?
The consistent use of present tense versus past tense throughout texts

Use of the continuous form of verbs in the present and past tense to mark actions in progress (e.g. she is drumming, he was shouting)

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Year 3

Introduce:

Fiction
Secure use of planning tools: Story map /story mountain / story grids / ‘Boxing-up’ grid
(Refer to Story-Type grids)

Plan opening around character(s), setting, time of day and type of weather

Paragraphs to organise ideas into each story part

Extended vocabulary to introduce 5 story parts:
Introduction –should include detailed description of setting or characters
Build-up –build in some suspense towards the problem or dilemma
Problem / Dilemma –include detail of actions / dialogue
Resolution – should link with the problem
Ending – clear ending should link back to the start, show how the character is feeling, how the character or situation has changed from the beginning.

Non-Fiction
(Refer to Connectives and Sentence Signposts document for Introduction and Endings)

Introduce:
Secure use of planning tools:
e.g. Text map, washing line, ‘Boxing –up’ grid, story grids
Paragraphs to organise ideas around a theme
Introduction Develop hook to introduce and tempt reader in e.g. Who….? What….? Where….?
Why….? When….? How….?
Middle Section(s)
Group related ideas /facts into paragraphs
Sub headings to introduce sections / paragraphs
Topic sentences to introduce paragraphs Lists of steps to be taken
Bullet points for facts Flow diagram Develop Ending Personal response Extra information / reminders e.g. Information boxes/ Five Amazing Facts Wow comment
Use of the perfect form of verbs to mark relationships of time and cause e.g. I have written it down so I can check what it said.

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Year 4

Introduce:
Secure use of planning tools: e.g. story map /story mountain /story grids /’Boxing-up’ grids
(Refer to Story Types grids)

Plan opening using:
Description /action

Paragraphs: to organise each part of story to indicate a change in place or jump in time
Build in suspense writing to introduce the dilemma
Developed 5 parts to story Introduction Build-up Problem / Dilemma Resolution Ending
Clear distinction between resolution and ending. Ending should include reflection on events or the characters.

Non-Fiction
(Refer to Connectives and Sentence Signposts document for Introduction and Endings)
Introduce: Secure use of planning tools: Text map/ washing line/ ‘Boxing –up’ grid

Paragraphs to organise ideas around a theme
Logical organisation
Group related paragraphs
Develop use of a topic sentence
Link information within paragraphs with a range of connectives.
Use of bullet points, diagrams
Introduction Middle section(s) Ending
Ending could Include personal opinion, response, extra information, reminders, question, warning, encouragement to the reader
Appropriate choice of pronoun or noun across sentences

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Year 5

Secure independent use of planning tools
Story mountain /grids/flow diagrams
(Refer to Story Types grids)

Plan opening using:
Description /action/dialogue

Paragraphs: Vary connectives within paragraphs to build cohesion into a paragraph
Use change of place, time and action to link ideas across paragraphs.

Use 5 part story structure
Writing could start at any of the 5 points.
This may include flashbacks
Introduction –should include action / description -character or setting / dialogue
Build-up –develop suspense techniques
Problem / Dilemma –may be more than one problem to be resolved
Resolution –clear links with dilemma
Ending –character could reflect on events, any changes or lessons, look forward to the future ask a question.

Non-Fiction
(Refer to Connectives and Sentence Signposts document for Introduction and Endings)

Introduce:
Independent planning across all genres and application
Secure use of range of layouts suitable to text.
Structure:
Introduction / Middle / Ending
Secure use of paragraphs: Use a variety of ways to open texts and draw reader in and make the purpose clear

Link ideas within and across paragraphs using a full range of connectives and signposts Use rhetorical questions to draw reader in
Express own opinions clearly
Consistently maintain viewpoint
Summary clear at the end to appeal directly to the reader

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Year 6

Secure independent planning across story types using 5 part story structure.
Include suspense, cliff hangers, flashbacks/forwards,
time slips
Start story at any point of the 5 part structure
Maintain plot consistently working from plan

Paragraphs -Secure use of linking ideas within and across paragraphs

Secure development of characterisation

Non-fiction:

Secure planning across non-fiction genres and application

Use a variety of text layouts appropriate to purpose

Use range of techniques to involve the reader –comments, questions, observations, rhetorical questions
Express balanced coverage of a topic

Use different techniques to conclude texts

Use appropriate formal and informal styles of writing
Choose or create publishing format to enhance text type and engage the reader

Linking ideas across paragraphs using a wider range of cohesive devices:

semantic cohesion (e.g. repetition of a word or phrase),
grammatical connections (e.g. the use of adverbials such as on the other hand, in contrast, or as a consequence),
and elision Layout devices, such as headings, sub-headings, columns, bullets, or
tables, to structure text

Be a Talk for Writing School!

365 days in my shoes Day 116

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It’s Friday!

What did your week bring for you?

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I had an amazing weekend as I was lucky enough to sing as guest soloist at the Sage Gateshead in Hall One with an audience of around 800!

I performed with three brass bands – 90 players in total. They didn’t all accompany me at the same time. But it was such a blast.

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Monday was a day for Serendipity and my day did get off to a very unexpected but extremely ORRsome start.

https://highheelsandhighnotes.wordpress.com/2013/04/21/365-days-in-my-shoes-day-112/

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Strange feeling today as our governors met to agree the advert and person specification for my job. The strange part is not being included or involved and yet still in post.

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Today has to have been one of the biggest emotional rollercoasters of many a week. I received a phone call from our clerk to the governing body asking if I would let the children and parents know that I would be leaving at the end of term as the advert for my job would be out within 48 hours. I have been putting off writing my letter to the children just as much as telling them face to face.

Today I could not avoid that. I prepared my ‘letter’ populated with photos of memories etc… and called an assembly at the end of the day.

I have never taken so many deep breaths in order to be able to explain what was happening. Today I held it together in front of the children. Behind closed doors is another story.

As each week slips by I know I will need to invest in an extremely good waterproof mascara.

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ORRsome day!

I visited my new school. How amazing it was to be greeted by two children going to breakfast club and they shouted good morning to me by name across the path. All staff made me feel so welcome and I had a brilliant day. I go back tomorrow too.

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The weekend begins here!

What will it bring for you?

It has been such an emotionally charged week finally seeing my job advertised.

BUT IT’S THE WEEKEND AND IT’S TIME TO CELEBRATE!!!

365 days in my shoes Day 115

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Five a week maths

Progression in multiplying and dividing by 10, 100, 1000 etc…

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Count on and back in 10s to 100.
Count on from any multiple of 10, to 100.

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Level 1
Introduce the symbols x,+,- and ÷.
Solve word problems involving simple multiplication with support.
Count on and back in 10s beyond 100.
Count on and back in 10s from any multiple of 10 and beyond 100.
Rapid recall of the 10x table.

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Level 2
Multiply a 1 digit by 10 eg 7×10=70.
Divide multiples of 10 by a single digit eg 70 ÷ 10 = 7.
Rapid recall of the x10 multiplication facts and associated division facts.
Count forwards and backwards in steps of 100.

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Level 3
Multiply 1 digit numbers by 100.
Multiply 2 digit numbers by 10.
Divide multiples of 100 by 100.
Scaling – multiply single digits by multiples of 10. (4×60) 4×6=24, 4×60=240.
Multiply 2/3 digit numbers by 10.
Multiply 2/3 digit numbers by 100.

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Level 4
Multiply 1 digit number by 10 and work out the corresponding dividing by 10 fact.
Multiply 1 digit number by 100 and work out the corresponding division fact.
Multiply a 2 digit number by a multiple of 10 and work out the corresponding division fact.
Multiply a 2 digit number by a multiple of 100 and work out the corresponding division fact.
Multiply a 3digit number by a multiple of 100 and work out the corresponding division fact.
X and ÷ 1 place decimals by 10, 100 and 1000.

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Level 5
Multiply and divide 2 place decimal numbers by 10, 100 and 1000 and beyond into 10 000 and 100000.
Multiply and divide 3 place decimal numbers by 10, 100 and 1000 and beyond into 10 000 and 100000.
Scaling using decimals; 0.4×6=, 0.4x 60= and 0.4 x 600 =

365 days in my shoes Day 114

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Pie Corbett at Shotton Primary School

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Our INSET day following the Easter holidays was spent in the fab company of Pie Corbett. This was the third time Pie had been to my school.

The focus of the day was SPaG a la Pie in the morning and a look at creative writing through art, photos, sculpture etc… in the afternoon.

I’ve already blogged on SPaG previously with Pie and the link to that is here.

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https://highheelsandhighnotes.wordpress.com/2013/03/09/365-days-in-my-shoes-day-68/

We did spend some time collating thoughts about what we had learned about teaching grammar and shared these via flipchart. These are listed below.

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NOUNS
Think about the effect it has within the sentence
Using the specific word – creating a picture
Name it – give the noun a name. If it’s a dog – what kind of dog etc….

VERBS
As powerful as the noun
Use a range of verbs
Choose a verb that describes what you see in your head

ADJECTIVES
Don’t state the obvious
Don’t overuse them
Can change the mood

TEACHING IT
Daily
In context
Trying it out – does it sound right?
Read a range of texts
From as young as possible
Modelling high quality use of language
Be creative – play games
It’s OK to get it wrong
Challenge children with the choices they make and the impact upon the reader.

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All ideas are directly from Pie’s work.

Pie shared many ideas regarding how and when to introduce the implicit and explicit teaching and learning of terminology.
THESE ARE CITED HERE – Pie Corbett
Introducing grammatical constructions and terminology at a point which is relevant to the focus of learning.
a. Use your assessment of the ‘cold task’ (as well as picking up on what is happening daily) to decide what key sentence features need teaching for the children to make progress.
b. Decide what key language features and sentence types will be needed to help the children write the text type, making good progress.
c. Begin rehearsing these features on a daily basis, using mini whiteboards and spoken games to develop a fluency in sentence construction.
The emphasis is on effects and constructing meanings, not on the feature or terminology itself.
Read as writers – select or write a good model of the chosen text type, building in the typical features that create an effect.
Read as writers – some weaker examples, discuss and model improvements.
Read as writers – a number of strong/weak examples, gradually building up an explicit writing toolkit as well as helping children internalise an implicit ‘feel’ for good writing.
Continue to rehearse the sentence features on a daily basis until they become increasingly embedded as part of the children’s writing repertoire.
Purposefully, demonstrate the use of these features during shared writing and expect children to ‘have a go’ in their own writing.
Discuss in feedback, the effect created, focussing on ‘good’ examples as well as considering how to improve weaker examples.
The learning objective is to open up a ‘repertoire of possibilities’, not to teach about correct ways of writing.

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Reading as a writer
Look at a piece of writing as a class, asking the question;
‘What are the effects being created and how has the writer achieved them?’
With the children, problem-solving sample texts together, co-constructing a ‘writing toolkit’. Add to the basic toolkit by looking at other examples, written by high quality authors. The toolkit will be used later to focus shared and independent writing.
Keep rehearsing the features of the toolkits through daily sentence practice and ‘mini-writes’. These might be oral or written. The aim is for the children to rehearse the sentence features so much that in the end they become internalised as part of the child’s writing repertoire which can then be drawn upon automatically.
Suspense Toolkit
To make the writing scary, you can: –
• Put your main character in a dangerous, dark setting
• Use an adverb starter
• Use powerful verbs to build a picture for the reader
• Describe the setting – use the five senses
• Move the character through the setting
• Use short, punchy sentences for impact
• Use words to paint a picture of the setting for the reader
• Use a preposition starter to describe the setting
• Use sentence of three to build up descriptions
• Use a dramatic connective
• Introduce a threat to keep the reader in suspense
• Use an empty word to hide the threat
• Use a rhetorical question to excite readers imaginations
• Add a short clause for dramatic effect
• Show main character’s reaction
This type of activity weaves the children’s growing understanding of grammar into their thinking ‘as a writer’. Depending on the year group, the suspense toolkit will vary in length. In year two, you might just have:
• Hide your main character in a dark, lonely place.
• Your main character hears something scary and reacts.
Over time, the toolkit can be built up so that the teaching is cumulative. Add to the toolkit by looking at examples of suspense writing written by high quality authors. It is very useful for the children to have a favourite picture book or story that they know well and can be referred to.
When children come to write, it is important that the toolkits are optional – ‘here is a list of approaches that we have noticed writers using to create suspense and when you are writing, you can use these…. however, you may also have some other ideas to try.’ This approach is totally different to ‘success criteria’ which may be a reductive list of language features needed to gain a level without any thought about their purpose, e.g. to create suspense. In narrative writing, you will need toolkits for – openings, endings, action, suspense, characterisation, dialogue, setting and description. It is also worth working out a ‘generic’ toolkit for each year group – basic grammatical features that we expect to see in all writing, e.g. in year 1, you expect capital letter and full stop.

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Shared writing
Before moving into the shared writing, children may need to practice parts of the Suspense Toolkit, e.g. varying powerful verbs, using preposition starters. Quickfire games are an effective way to help children to remember and internalise the toolkit so that it begins to become part of their writing repertoire rather than a bunch of problematical things to remember that could actually make writing harder and interfere with compositional flow. The more children read examples, discuss their impact and how the author creates effects as well as become involved in using the toolkits both in shared and independent writing, the more they internalise the patterns and approaches.

Shared writing allows grammar work to be interwoven into the act of composition and can support children in becoming better communicators.
Children need to see whole texts being written and this has to happen over a number of days. It is important to have the main model and toolkit displayed so that both these can be referred to by the children. This is very helpful scaffolding for the weaker writer. As you are doing shared writing, involve the children but also draw attention and talk through any new or demanding aspects. Shared writing is built around 3 key ideas – I’ll show you how to do something (demonstration); now we’ll do it together (joint composition); then you can have a go on your own (independent writing). Shared writing must be interactive and involve children generating and selecting ideas with constant discussion about ‘what works’. The teacher’s role is to shape and challenge the writing and to refer to a rich range of children’s literature to help generate ideas.
Once the shared writing paragraph has been created together, children use it to build their own writing. They will then have the initial model, the toolkit that makes features explicit as well as the shared writing. All of this can be used to scaffold independent writing. Weaker writers may find it helpful to ‘hug closely’ to the original model but stronger writers should embellish and add in their own ideas whilst still focussing on creating the same effects, e.g. suspense.
Shared writing needs to be used from Nursery onwards. Very often this is a neglected part of early years provision and so children do not begin to see themselves as writers and writing is not part of their everyday play. Constant shared writing means that the teacher can begin to teach composition right from the very start, creating class stories with everyone involved giving ideas. These can be turned into homemade ‘big books’ and be used as part of early reading. Across a primary school, ‘reading as a writer’, writing toolkits and shared writing should be common practice. In this way, grammatical understanding and skill becomes woven into the purposeful teaching of reading and writing. Constant use and discussion of grammar will help children gain a deep understanding that will last them a lifetime of language use.
Grammar films can be found on: http://www.oxfordschoolimprovement.co.uk/professional-development/issueVideo/Grammar_punct_spelling/pie-tips-grammar

c Pie Corbett 2012

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THE POETRY CLIMATE

How do you teach poetry?

How creative are you with language?

Pie shared ideas for teaching poetry and writing creatively using pictures, photos, sculpture, art etc…

Poem of the week – Little Monkey
Poem of the day – Clouds
Displays of poems in surprising places.
Poetry tree.
Desert island poems.
Poem swaps.
Poem cards in classrooms.
Start staff meetings with a poem.
Each class sends another class a poem once a week.
Garage box of poetry books for daily browsing.
Use of poetry CDs and DVDs.

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POETRY GAMES with Pie
Word association

Words in the bag – truth under frail

If I had…..

I stood in….. /and my shadow….

Pie 1

Pie 2

Pie 3

Pie 4

Images, pictures and sculptures evoke so many emotions and equally ideas to out into writing.

Pie 5

RADAR THE DRAGON

Our shared poem about Radar.

Radar the dragon has fiery eyes that wander the desolate landscape,

Shimmering scales as sharp as a razor shell,

Crescent talons curved like a dense scythe.

Pie 6

She pinches the dry sandwich, as delicate as a butterfly,

And her suspicious eyes gaze at the intriguing reflection of the man behind….

He slices succulent ham – pursing his thin lips.

Pie 9

Pie 12

Pie 13

Pie 14

SHARED WRITING WITH PIE
Generating ideas and judge.
First thought not always the best – keep word searching.
All ideas accepted.
Fear is the enemy.
All succeed uniquely.
Experiment – new combinations.
Beyond the cliché.
Name it – add detail
Beware of ‘overwriting’.
Jot down ideas – magpie from others.
Writing journals.
Double act.
The roots of creative language.

BASIC TOOLKIT WITH PIE
Generate and judge – powerful words
Choosing the fresh word combinations
Alliteration – sound effects
Similes, metaphors and personification
Inclinations – ask questions, describe, tease, riddle, invent new things, turn objects into creatures, etc.
Brainstorm words and ideas

By showing to a pupil’s imagination many opportunities and few restraints, and instilling into him confidence and a natural motive for writing, the odds are that something – maybe not much, but something – of our common genius will begin to put a word in.
Ted Hughes – Poetry in the Making.

Our day was interspersed with a small owl hooting its way through each session.

Brought new meaning to OWL PIE!!!

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